Joel Kinnaman talks RoboCop reboot

"I can't imagine how RoboCop could be PG-13"

RoboCop is getting a fresh lick of paint in José Padilha’s upcoming reimagining, and according to new star Joel Kinnaman, the reboot will also represent a significant departure from Paul Verhoeven’s original.

“RoboCop is going to be a lot more human,” explains Kinnaman, who shot to stardom in TV’s The Killing. The first movie is one of my favourite movies. I love it. Of course, Verhoeven has that very special tone, and it’s not going to have that tone.

“It’s a re-imagination of it,” he continues. “There’s a lot of stuff from the original. There are some details and throwbacks, but this version is a much better acting piece for Alex Murphy and especially when he is RoboCop. It’s much more challenging.”

He also dropped a few tidbits about RoboCop’s suit, which will also be changing for the new film. “It’s not going to be jaw acting,” he explained. “They’re still working on the suit and how it’s going to look, but the visor is going to be see-through. You’re going to see his eyes.”

All of which might give purists some cause for alarm, although Kinnaman’s comments about the film’s potential certificate might help to allay some fears.

“I sincerely hope they’re going for R, because I can’t imagine how RoboCop could be PG-13,” said the star. “That would be a huge mistake. If I have any say in it, I will fight very hard for it. It has to be violent.” RoboCop will open in the US on 9 August 2012.

How are you feeling about the proposed reboot? Share your thoughts, below.

Comments

    • ChrisWootton

      Mar 27th 2012, 9:04

      f**k me if I hear "re-imagination" one more time I might go postal. How about just "imagination" it's like saying "I've had a re-idea" and then using some other persons idea. They are missing the point of the story entirely. This will be as bad (if not worst) than Fright Night.

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    • FBRBarnes72

      Mar 27th 2012, 10:48

      Well of course they're reimagining it. The original's classic 80s cyberpunk, all neon and chrome. Now that our view of the future has changed in ways the 80s could never have assumed, it's natural they have to do some serious updating. In the 80s, we thought a mere 3 years from now we'd have artificial intelligences arguing over what we should be buying, holographic cinemas and hoverboards.

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    • demmike

      Mar 27th 2012, 11:43

      b***hes leave

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    • ChrisWootton

      Mar 27th 2012, 12:33

      But, re-imagining isn't even a recognised word in the english language

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    • Mings

      Mar 27th 2012, 13:03

      Hi Chris. Yes it is. It's the present participle of reimagine, meaning to imagine or conceive something in a new way. I'd buy that for a dollar.

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    • ChrisWootton

      Mar 27th 2012, 13:43

      Thanks Mings.. that'll teach me to copy and paste into the dictionary programme.. :)

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    • Mings

      Mar 27th 2012, 16:56

      A bit extreme there, King of Cinema. I agree with FDR. Sci-fi is probably one of the only genres that can tolerate 'reimagining' without harming the original source material. The original movie (from 1987 I think), imagines a dystopian future where the world is run by multinational conglomerates and corrupt politicians. Now we actually live in a dystopian world run my multinational conglomerates and corrupt politicians, it could be interesting to see how the Robocop concept can fit in with perhaps another version of a possible future. A character is only as interesting as the world it inhabits, and how it reacts within that environment, so I think there can be room for more than one person's vision for any one character. Batman is a good example of this, no reason why Robocop should be any different. Oh and no problem Chris (I type smugly, basking in the glory of possibly the only thing I get right all week) ;-)

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    • Ali1748

      Mar 27th 2012, 19:41

      FAIL.....Just fail. If only it was being directed by Aronofsky and Fass was Robocop.

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    • MadMatt

      Mar 27th 2012, 23:46

      "This is a much better acting piece..." That's a monumental insult to Peter Weller's layered, moving performance in the original movie, and to the character work in Ed Neumeier's and Michael Miner's terrific, inventive screenplay. I seem to recall that there are plenty of sequences in Verhoeven's masterpiece where we see Murphy's full face, even after he becomes Robocop. As for a 're-imagining' - it's not like this was a book or comic adaptation, open to plenty of subsequent iterations, it was an ORIGINAL film... remember them? It was created specifically for the screen and told a complete story arc within its running time. And clearly, they are jettisoning the hilarious social satire as well. Anyone looking forward to this is an idiot.

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    • MadMatt

      Mar 27th 2012, 23:51

      Here's a representative shot for anyone who has never seen the original (a group which seemingly includes Joel Kinnaman aka the creepy bloke from the c**p version of The Killing) : http://www.imdb.com/media/rm212450048/tt0093870 Yes, I think I can just about see his eyes in this picture, even though he has already become Robocop by this point in the story...

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    • writerdave87

      Mar 28th 2012, 1:50

      Lol at Dalidab ranting at this guy and the film just days after he lectured everyone on not judging Kirsten Stewart in a film they haven't seen yet.

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    • FBSHarrigan

      Mar 30th 2012, 8:37

      A pattern is beginning to emerge. It seems that film makers are beginning to take on the mentality of remaking old beloved movies instead of coming up with their own ideas for new films. If this is not the Dark Age of Cinema than I have no idea what that would look like. Like the Dark Ages, the same ideas are just regurgitated and copied and any new thoughts or innovations seem to be greatly discouraged. All these remakes promote stagnation and ignorance; that is, they discourage trying to find new ways to make films in favor of rehashing. That is not to say that this film's failure is a guarantee, but even if it is a success it will encourage remakes, most of which do indeed fail. This just seems to bring to light what a sad moment in cinema history this will become. http://www.videodetective.com/movies/wrath-of-the-titans/23594 This is a sequel to a remake and another example of what is happening in Cinema. Hollywood seems hurting for ideas.

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