Reviews

2 Days In Paris

4

From its culture-crash plotline to its themes of jealousy, meddling in-laws and misinterpreted text messages, much of Julie Delpy’s second directorial stab (after 2002’s Looking For Jimmy) feels familiar at first.

That she’s able to tiptoe around cliché (except where it allows her to score a barbed wisecrack at both Yank and Gallic expense) and serve up a romantic tale that’s fresh, lively and bloody funny is testament to 2 Days In Paris’ quality.

As the French-American amours (Marion a photographer with a wonky eye, Jack a neurotic interior designer) popping to Paris on their way back to NYC, Delpy and Adam Goldberg pack plenty of relationship sturm and drang into their brief visit. Contrivances abound, with Marion bumping into numerous ex-boyfriends. Fortunately, Delpy’s punchy script is an equal-opportunity offender, dropping frequent laughter bombs, while her DoP Lubomir Bakchev’s roving, handheld camera undercuts the hackneyed setup, roaming street-level Paris like a pickpocket.

The French multi-talent clearly squeezed as much creative juice as she could from her stints on Before Sunrise and Before Sunset, 2 Days owing its structural DNA to Richard Linklater’s two-hander duet. She’s also sponged from early Woody Allen, picking up his feel for screwball timing and character foibles (in this case, those of her own mere and pere as Marion’s bickering olds).

 

While never straying far from the smart, edgy cookie she’s played throughout her career, Delpy and the scene-snatching Goldberg feel like a living, breathing couple. She’s headstrong, sly, a bit of a bitch; he’s witty, whingey and probably has skidmarks in his undies. Amid all the walking and talking, they entertain, satirise, bond, while scuffling to get to grips with their still-developing love-match. At credits time, you’ll be keen to know how their future pans out. Here’s hoping Delpy steals another page from Linklater’s book, revisiting the Marion-and-Jack story a few years down the line...

Verdict:

2 Days is a sparky, crowd-cheering gem buoyed by Julie Delpy's smart writing and Adam Goldberg's tart whining. Less swoony than Linklater's Before Sunrise/Sunset, but Delpy nails the relationship humour.

Film Details

  • tbc
  • UK Theatrical Release Date: August 31st 2007
  • Director

User Reviews

    • FBEXanthopoul

      Jan 21st 2012, 16:36

      4

      www.unsungfilms.com by Angeliki Coconi, Set in Paris, written and directed by Julie Delpy and starring Julie Delpy and Adam Goldberg, 2 Days In Paris (2007) follows a couple on their unromantic stay in the city of romance. Brilliantly written, directed and acted, the film keeps its audience laughing from beginning to end. Marion (played by Julie Delpy), a photographer from Paris, lives in New York with her Jewish-American neurotic and hypochondriac interior designer boyfriend, Jack (played by Adam Goldberg). After a holiday in Venice in which they both manage to annoy each other to the bone, the couple stops over in Paris to visit Marion’s family and pick up her cat. In the two days they spend in Marion’s hometown, Jack gets increasingly worried about the fact that his girlfriend has kept in touch with her numerous ex-lovers, and he soon discovers that not speaking French in Paris is quite the inconvenience. Funnier and much more intelligent than your average romantic comedy, 2 Days In Paris’ screenplay, direction, editing and soundtrack’s composition and performance are signed by Julie Delpy, who also stars as the impulsive Marion. Highly humorous and sarcastic, the film at the same time manages to come across sensible, emotional and weirdly romantic. Avoiding the stereotypical ‘a man and a woman meet, they fall in love, they are torn apart due to a misunderstanding and then get back together for good’, and opting for something more like ‘the man and the woman have gotten to know each other a bit too much, to the extent that they now dislike one another’, Julie Delpy delivers a very realistic and utterly hilarious romantic comedy. As Marion, the actress is perfect. Offering a particularly strong, funny, but at the same time, believable performance, Delpy’s acting skills are impeccable. And not much can be said about Adam Goldberg, who is definitely one of the funniest comic actors cinema has ever known. His comedy is excellent, and his New York-Jewish neurosis combined with Delpy’s French naturalness, offer a culture clash so amusing that very few comic pairs could have achieved. With a great sense of comic timing and a funnily anxious camera work, 2 Days In Paris is smart and bizarre in every aspect. In February 2010, Julie Delpy announced to have been working on a sequel, titled 2 Days In New York. The movie was filmed in Manhattan last October and it is now at a post-production stage. Julie Delpy will be playing again Marion, but this time alongside her new on-screen boyfriend, played by Chris Rock. No Adam Goldberg this time around, much to my dismay. Angeliki Coconi at www.unsungfilms.com

      Alert a moderator